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Denmark

Open Data DK (DK0054)

Overview

At-a-Glance

Action Plan: Denmark Action Plan 2017-2019

Action Plan Cycle: 2017

Status: Inactive

Institutions

Lead Institution: Open Data DK

Support Institution(s): 34 local governments, 3 regional governments and the Danish Business Authority, Local Government Denmark, GeoSjælland and GeoFyn

Policy Areas

Access to Information, Capacity Building, E-Government, Open Data, Public Participation, Subnational

IRM Review

IRM Report: Denmark Implementation Report 2017-2019, Denmark Design Report 2017–2019

Starred: Pending IRM Review

Early Results: Marginal

Design i

Verifiable: Yes

Relevant to OGP Values: Access to Information , Civic Participation , Technology

Potential Impact:

Implementation i

Completion:

Description

What is the public problem that the commitment will address?: There is value in making freely available public data when developing cities and regions. With open public data, all interested parties will have a chance to make services or projects that meet citizens’ needs – and which businesses and entrepreneurs can profit from. Open data can help generate new products and services or improve existing ones – for the benefit of citizens. At the same time, open data can increase transparency in the public administration so that citizens and businesses become more active players in our democracy. Open Data DK also meets the challenge of all local governments and regional governments potentially publishing data individually. This would create confusion and a mess of non-standardised data, which would do nothing to promote the use of released data. Finally, Open Data DK supports the joint-municipal and joint-public sector initiatives in the area of open data.; What is the commitment?: Open Data DK helps local governments and regional governments get started working with open data. It is a new area in many local governments and regional governments so it may be difficult to get the process started. Open Data DK provides a framework for knowledge sharing about open data between public authorities – and businesses. The purpose is to create transparency in the public administration and provide a basis for data-driven growth by making data freely available for public authorities, private businesses and civil society in general. Municipal and regional data is made open and freely available on a shared data platform (open source) so that it can be easily accessed and used as raw material in the development of applications and services, or serve as the foundation for analyses, trend assessments, research, etc. Open data can create increased transparency in the public administration so that citizens and businesses can become even more active coplayers in their local democracy. In autumn 2017 and in 2018, a number of initiatives will be put in place to promote publication and use of public data. The initiatives include: • Information meetings for local governments and regional governments, which deal specifically with releasing the data which the local governments/regional governments possess: How to get started? What potential does public data hold? • Individual introduction meetings for local governments and regional governments • Updating and development of existing guidelines • Inspiration and dialogue meetings with businesses • Development of the open data platform, which serves to make it easier to release and use data, e.g. with focus on standardisation of data • Collaboration with educational institutions Open Data DK is organised with a board and a number of working teams that promote sharing among its members. It also focuses on regional/local needs, which means that Open Data DK’s finances are organised so that funds are earmarked for regional initiatives. This makes it possible to have an overall regional focus on tourism data in all of North Jutland and mobility data in all of East Jutland. Currently participating in the commitment are: 31 local governments, 3 regional governments and partners such as the Danish Business Authority, Local Government Denmark, GeoFyn and GeoSjælland. Besides the participation of public authorities, considerable focus is aimed at including businesses and citizens, e.g. in the form of dialogue meetings, hackathons, data drinks and collaboration with educational institutions.; How will the commitment contribute to solve the public problem?: The Open Data DK commitment helps create an open public sector by releasing data and thus creating a foundation for collaboration between the public and private sector, citizens, businesses and knowledge institutions on development and innovation.; Why is this commitment relevant to OGP values?: With open data everyone gets free access to information about the public sector and this makes Open Data DK instrumental in ensuring a more open and transparent public sector, in which civil society can participate. Open Data DK is also based on inclusion and involvement of stakeholders. A key part of the work of the commitment is to engender knowledge about the data that is in demand and needed – in businesses, for example. On many occasions, Open Data DK has provided the framework for a direct dialogue between public authorities and businesses on open data. Open Data DK is thus helpful in terms of, on the one hand, getting local governments/regional governments started on working with open data and acquiring more knowledge about the need and, on the other hand, making it easier for businesses and parties interested in data to engage in a dialogue with the public sector about open data.; Additional information: Open Data DK is financed by membership subscriptions of DKK 25,000 annually per member. Half of the subscriptions is earmarked for the five regional ambassadors of Open Data DK and is allocated by the members of the region. This increases the possibility of co-determination and influence among members and makes it possible to focus on selected efforts regionally/locally. The remaining half of the subscriptions is used centrally on the secretariat, operations and developing the platform, etc. Open Data DK is a partner of commitment 5.1 of the joint public Digital Strategy 2016-2020, under which a partnership has been created for open public data with the Danish Business Authority, Danish Regions, Local Government Denmark and Open Data DK. Open Data DK is on the steering committee of commitment 3.4 of the Digital Strategy. In collaboration with the Danish Business Authority, Danish Regions and Local Government Denmark, Open Data DK puts the spotlight on legal issues in opening data and how they can be tackled. The chairman of Open Data DK is the Danish representative in the global initiative Open and Agile Smart Cities (OASC, http://www.oascities.org).

IRM Midterm Status Summary

Commitment 5: Open Data DK

Language of the commitment as it appears in the action plan:

Open Data DK helps local governments and regional governments get started working with open data. It is a new area in many local governments and regional governments so it may be difficult to get the process started. Open Data DK provides a framework for knowledge sharing about open data between public authorities – and businesses.

The purpose is to create transparency in the public administration and provide a basis for data -driven growth by making data freely available for public authorities, private businesses and civil society in general. Municipal and regional data is made open and freely available on a shared data platform (open source) so that it can be easily accessed and used as raw material in the development of applications and services, or serve as the foundation for analyses, trend assessments, research, etc. Open data can create increased transparency in the public administration so that citizens and businesses can become even more active coplayers in their local democracy.

In autumn 2017 and in 2018, a number of initiatives will be put in place to promote publication and use of public data. The initiatives include:

· Information meetings for local governments and regional governments, which deal specifically with releasing the data which the local governments/regional governments possess: How to get started? What potential does public data hold?

· Individual introduction meetings for local governments and regional governments

· Updating and development of existing guidelines

· Inspiration and dialogue meetings with businesses

· Development of the open data platform, which serves to make it easier to release and use data, e.g. with focus on standardisation of data

· Collaboration with educational institutions

Open Data DK is organised with a board and a number of working teams that promote sharing among its members. It also focuses on regional/local needs, which means that Open Data DK's finances are organised so that funds are earmarked for regional initiatives. This makes it possible to have an overall regional focus on tourism data in all of North Jutland and mobility data in all of East Jutland. Currently participating in the commitment are: 31 local governments, 3 regional governments and partners such as the Danish Business Authority, Local Government Denmark, GeoFyn and GeoSjælland. Besides the participation of public authorities, considerable focus is aimed at including businesses and citizens, e.g. in the form of dialogue meetings, hackathons, data drinks[Note : A "data drink" refers to an event during which coders, programmers, public employees, designers, academics, entrepreneurs, and students meet over a drink to discuss cases and scenarios regarding open data. See, for example, "Aarhus Data Drinks," Alexandra Instituttet, https://alexandra.dk/dk/aktuelt/arrangementer/2013/aarhus-data-drinks-2. ] and collaboration with educational institutions."

Milestones:

5.1 60 local governments have joined Open Data DK

5.2 4 regional governments have joined Open Data DK

5.3 7 dialogue meetings have been held

5.4 Study related to mapping tool (standardisation) has been initiated

Start Date: 2016

End Date: Unspecified

Editorial note: For the full text of this commitment, see "The Danish OGP National Action Plan 2017–2019," Danish Agency for Digitisation, https://en.digst.dk/policy-and-strategy/open-government/open-government-partnership-ogp-action-plan/, pp. 14–16.

Context and Objectives

This commitment seeks to improve transparency in public administration and allow for data-driven growth through the provision of free data for civil society, private business, and public authorities. The initiative provides municipal and regional data on a shared open-source data platform. This data can be used in applications and services, analyses, and research.

Specific solutions proposed through Open Data DK include information meetings for local and regional governments, individual introductory meetings, updates of existing guidelines, inspiration meetings with businesses, development of the open data platform, and collaboration with educational institutions.

Open Data DK has a regional concentration, including a focus on tourism data in North Jutland and mobility data in East Jutland. Thirty-one local governments, three regional governments, and a variety of partners (including the Danish Business Authority, Local Government Denmark, Geo Fyn, and GeoSjælland) participate in the initiative.

Analysing the commitment in the context of OGP values, the seven dialogue meetings, as well as the anticipated hackathons and "data drinks," aim to involve citizens, businesses, and educational institutions in the development of Open Data DK. The commitment therefore has the potential to strengthen civic participation. The commitment aims to make extensive use of technological innovation, which may further advance transparency in public administration.

The IRM researcher considers the commitment specific enough to be verifiable, because its milestones are concrete. (This is the case regarding the number of local and regional governments expected to join Open Data DK, the number of dialogue meetings, and whether a study related to the mapping tool has been realised.)

The IRM researcher considers the potential impact of the initiative to be minor. While the engagement with start-up communities and private businesses constitutes a positive step for open government, the scope of the milestones, as described, centre mostly on intra-governmental coordination and organisation.

Next steps

· The IRM researcher recommends that, moving forward, commitments that are similar in nature (such as Commitments 4 and 5 on open data) be joined together, to give citizens a more comprehensive overview of government efforts on a particular theme.

· Since the commitment is already significantly implemented, the IRM researcher suggests that this commitment not be carried forward to the next action plan.

· The IRM researcher recommends that future commitments focus more on strengthening civil society engagement, rather than intra-governmental processes.

IRM End of Term Status Summary

5. Open Data DK

Language of the commitment as it appears in the action plan:

“Open Data DK helps local governments and regional governments get started working with open data. It is a new area in many local governments and regional governments, so it may be difficult to get the process started. Open Data DK provides a framework for knowledge sharing about open data between public authorities – and businesses.

The purpose is to create transparency in the public administration and provide a basis for data -driven growth by making data freely available for public authorities, private businesses and civil society in general. Municipal and regional data is made open and freely available on a shared data platform (open source) so that it can be easily accessed and used as raw material in the development of applications and services, or serve as the foundation for analyses, trend assessments, research, etc. Open data can create increased transparency in the public administration so that citizens and businesses can become even more active coplayers in their local democracy.

In autumn 2017 and in 2018, a number of initiatives will be put in place to promote publication and use of public data. The initiatives include:

  • Information meetings for local governments and regional governments, which deal specifically with releasing the data which the local governments/regional governments possess: How to get started? What potential does public data hold?
  • Individual introduction meetings for local governments and regional governments
  • Updating and development of existing guidelines
  • Inspiration and dialogue meetings with businesses
  • Development of the open data platform, which serves to make it easier to release and use data, e.g. with focus on standardisation of data
  • Collaboration with educational institutions

Open Data DK is organised with a board and a number of working teams that promote sharing among its members. It also focuses on regional/local needs, which means that Open Data DK’s finances are organised so that funds are earmarked for regional initiatives. This makes it possible to have an overall regional focus on tourism data in all of North Jutland and mobility data in all of East Jutland. Currently participating in the commitment are: 31 local governments, 3 regional governments and partners such as the Danish Business Authority, Local Government Denmark, GeoFyn and GeoSjælland. Besides the participation of public authorities, considerable focus is aimed at including businesses and citizens, e.g. in the form of dialogue meetings, hackathons, data drinks [18] and collaboration with educational institutions.”

Milestones:

  • 60 local governments have joined Open Data DK
  • Four regional governments have joined Open Data DK
  • Seven dialogue meetings have been held
  • Study related to mapping tool (standardisation) has been initiated

Start Date: 2016

End Date: Unspecified

Editorial note: For the full text of this commitment, see “The Danish OGP National Action Plan 2017–2019,” Danish Agency for Digitisation, pp. 14–16, https://en.digst.dk/policy-and-strategy/open-government/open-government-partnership-ogp-action-plan/.

IRM Design Report Assessment

IRM Implementation Report Assessment

·       Verifiable: Yes

·       Relevant: Access to information, Civic participation

·       Potential impact: Minor

·       Completion: Substantial

·       Did it Open Government? Marginal

This commitment sought to improve transparency in public administration and data-driven growth by providing free municipal and regional data on a shared open-source data platform (Open Data DK). The aim was for data to then be used by civil society, private businesses, and public authorities for applications, services, analyses, and research.

By the end of 2019, Open Data DK includes 40 municipalities, two regions, and a number of public institutions, including Local Government Denmark (KL) and the Danish Business Authority. However, these numbers are less than were originally envisioned in the action plan (60 municipalities and four regional governments), so the commitment is considered to be substantially—but not fully—complete. Eight dialogue meetings have been conducted with municipals and enterprises and single events (hackathons and “data drinks”) have been held and overseen by Open Data DK in accordance with the commitments’ milestones. Remaining activities concern ongoing dialogues with enterprises and regions as part of the Danish Digitization Strategy (2016–2020). The final milestone concerns technical consolidation of the data platform, which is still in progress as of the end of 2019. [19]

The strategies to raise awareness of open data through multi-stakeholder activities have emphasized both the need for and potential of sharing locally-available information. The activities (dialogue meetings with enterprises, hackathons, etc.) conducted by Open Data DK have been especially valuable in facilitating collaboration with data users and municipal representatives. Open Data DK and KL have documented examples of projects that have emerged from the commitment (e.g., hackathons), including data visualization tools and maps, traffic applications, and a general overview of municipal services. [20]

According to Open Data DK, the main challenges that have occurred during implementation primarily concern the need for more dialogue between enterprises and municipalities. Another concern is the lack of resources in smaller municipalities to cope with the open data agenda, [21] which explains the limitations in Open Data DK membership (Milestones 5.1 and 5.2).

Overall, the commitment has had a positive contribution towards data use at the local level resulting from closer dialogue between municipalities, regions, enterprises, and citizens. This ultimately increases the accessibility of information, as these projects present local data through open-source applications. However, given the focus on municipalities’ capacities to utilize open data and the nature of projects (infrastructure, energy, and geography), the commitment has had a marginal impact on improving access to information.

[18] A “data drink” refers to an event during which coders, programmers, public employees, designers, academics, entrepreneurs, and students meet over a drink to discuss cases and scenarios regarding open data. See, for example, “Aarhus Data Drinks”, Alexandra Instituttet, https://alexandra.dk/dk/aktuelt/arrangementer/2013/aarhus-data-drinks-2.

[19] “End-of-term report on Denmark’s OGP Action Plan 2017–2019”, Danish Agency for Digitisation, forthcoming.

[20] ”Små åbne data succeser – Konkrete eksempler på anvendelser af åbne data”, KL & Open Data DK, available at [in Danish] at http://reader.livedition.dk/aarhuskommune/874/html5/.

[21] Birgitte Kjærgaard (Open Data DK), interview with IRM researcher, 14 November 2019.


Commitments

  1. Platform for Citizens to Access Data the Government Holds about Them

    DK0068, 2019, Data Stewardship and Privacy

  2. Oversight Body for Social Services Claims

    DK0069, 2019, Access to Justice

  3. Anonymous Whistleblower Portals for Justice System Employees

    DK0070, 2019, Anti-Corruption

  4. Open National Archives Data

    DK0064, 2019, Access to Information

  5. Open Workplace Health and Safety Data

    DK0065, 2019, Access to Information

  6. Climate Atlas

    DK0066, 2019, Access to Information

  7. Publish Terrain, Climate, and Water Data

    DK0067, 2019, Access to Information

  8. Open Data for Citizens and Media

    DK0050, 2017, Access to Information

  9. Data Registers on a Shared Public Distribution Platform

    DK0051, 2017, E-Government

  10. Information Portal for Day-Care Facilities

    DK0052, 2017, E-Government

  11. Open Data and Smart City Forum

    DK0053, 2017, Access to Information

  12. Open Data DK

    DK0054, 2017, Access to Information

  13. Overview of Own Cases and Benefits

    DK0055, 2017, E-Government

  14. Nationwide Deployment of Telemedicine

    DK0056, 2017, E-Government

  15. My Log

    DK0057, 2017, E-Government

  16. Civil Society National Strategy

    DK0058, 2017, Marginalized Communities

  17. Report a Rule

    DK0059, 2017, E-Government

  18. OGP Forum

    DK0060, 2017, Public Participation

  19. Denmark’S Country Program for Uganda

    DK0061, 2017, Aid

  20. The 18Th International Anti-Corruption Conference

    DK0062, 2017, Anti-Corruption

  21. IATI (International Aid Transparency Initiative)

    DK0063, 2017, Access to Information

  22. Service Check of Local Government Consultations

    DK0034, 2014, Public Participation

  23. Call on All Municipalities to Facilitate Advance Voting

    DK0035, 2014, Marginalized Communities

  24. Letter of Invitation to First-Time Voters Urging Them to Vote

    DK0036, 2014, Marginalized Communities

  25. User Friendliness Requirements Regarding Digital Self-Service Solutions

    DK0037, 2014, Capacity Building

  26. Plan for Inclusion During the Transition to Digital Communication

    DK0038, 2014, Capacity Building

  27. Common Public Sector Digital Communication Campaign

    DK0039, 2014, Capacity Building

  28. Principles for Collaboration on the Modernisation of the Public Sector as Well as the Establishment of a Centre for Public Innovation

    DK0040, 2014, Capacity Building

  29. “Free Municipality” Pilot Projects

    DK0041, 2014, Subnational

  30. Recommendations from Growth Teams

    DK0042, 2014, Private Sector

  31. Strategy for Digital Welfare

    DK0043, 2014, E-Government

  32. Implementation of a New Charter for Interaction Between Volunteer Denmark/Associations Denmark and the Public Sector

    DK0044, 2014, Civic Space

  33. “Open Data Innovation Strategy” (ODIS)

    DK0045, 2014, Access to Information

  34. Data Distributor for the Distribution of Basic Data

    DK0046, 2014, Access to Information

  35. Open Government Camp 2014

    DK0047, 2014, Capacity Building

  36. Open Government Assistance to Myanmar

    DK0048, 2014, Aid

  37. Opening Key Public Datasets

    DK0049, 2014, Access to Information

  38. Online Open Government Partnership Community

    DK0001, 2012, E-Government

  39. Online OGP Handbook for Public Authorities and Institutions

    DK0002, 2012, E-Government

  40. Starred commitment Management Labs and New Forms of Co-Operation

    DK0003, 2012, Public Participation

  41. Consultation and Transparency of Development Aid Programmes: Design Aid Programmes

    DK0004, 2012, Aid

  42. Innovate with Aarhus

    DK0005, 2012, Capacity Building

  43. Citizen Self-Services: Increasing the Use of User Ratings in the Citizen’s Port Borger.Dk

    DK0006, 2012, E-Government

  44. Open Government Camp

    DK0007, 2012, Public Participation

  45. Renewed Effort for Open Government Data

    DK0008, 2012, Access to Information

  46. Regional Initiative on Open Data

    DK0009, 2012, Access to Information

  47. Reuse of Open Source Software in the Public Sector

    DK0010, 2012, E-Government

  48. Citizen Self-Services: Binding Guidelines for Self-Service Solutions

    DK0011, 2012, Capacity Building

  49. Citizen Self-Services: Guidance and Information on Accessibility to Digital Solutions

    DK0012, 2012, E-Government

  50. Citizen Self-Services: Peer-To-Peer Learning Programmes to Help Citizens Use Digital Self-Service

    DK0013, 2012, Capacity Building

  51. Citizen Self-Services: Location-Based Content and Re-Use of Content in Borger.Dk

    DK0014, 2012, E-Government

  52. Less Reporting Through Increased Re-Use of Key Data

    DK0015, 2012, E-Government

  53. Mypage” for Businesses

    DK0016, 2012, E-Government

  54. Companies to Be “Born Digitally”

    DK0017, 2012, E-Government

  55. Creating a Mediation and Complaints Institution for Responsible Business Behaviour

    DK0018, 2012, Human Rights

  56. International Human Rights Conference

    DK0019, 2012, Human Rights

  57. Promote Social Responsibility in the Fashion Business

    DK0020, 2012, Private Sector

  58. Reporting on Human Rights and the Climate

    DK0021, 2012, Human Rights

  59. Country by Country Reporting in the Extractive and Forestry Industries

    DK0022, 2012, Anti-Corruption

  60. Legislative Principles for the Digital Age

    DK0023, 2012, Legislative

  61. Consolidated Key Data

    DK0024, 2012, E-Government

  62. App Store for Digital Learning Resources

    DK0025, 2012, E-Government

  63. Starred commitment Preparing a Digital Reform of the Public Welfare Areas

    DK0026, 2012, E-Government

  64. Consultation and Transparency of Development Aid Programmes: Transparency in Aid

    DK0027, 2012, Aid

  65. Tracking Progress of Universities’ Transition to Digital-Only Administrative Communication

    DK0028, 2012, Education

  66. Disclosure of Status Reporting From the National IT Project Council

    DK0029, 2012, E-Government

  67. Overview of Public ICT Architecture

    DK0030, 2012, E-Government

  68. Publication of Educational Materials on the Government’s ICT Project Model

    DK0031, 2012, Capacity Building

  69. Smart Aarhus and Smart Region: Smart Aarhus

    DK0032, 2012, E-Government

  70. Smart Aarhus and Smart Region: Smart Region

    DK0033, 2012, E-Government

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