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Georgia

Public Procurement Improvements (GE0078)

Overview

At-a-Glance

Action Plan: Georgia Action Plan 2018-2019

Action Plan Cycle: 2018

Status: Active

Institutions

Lead Institution: LEPL – Public Procurement Agency (PPA)

Support Institution(s): NA

Policy Areas

Access to Information, Anti-Corruption, E-Government, Open Contracting and Public Procurement, Open Data, Public Procurement

IRM Review

IRM Report: Georgia Design Report 2018-2019

Starred: Pending IRM Review

Early Results: Pending IRM Review

Design i

Verifiable: Yes

Relevant to OGP Values: Access to Information , Technology

Potential Impact:

Implementation i

Completion: Pending IRM Review

Description

Commitment 13: Electronic innovations for more transparency and efficiency of public procurement

The Public Procurement Agency (PPA), with the support of the World Bank (WB) and the Department of International Development (DFID), also in cooperation with the Open Contracting Partnership (OCP) actively works on the introduction of the Open Contracting Data Standard (OCDS). It should be noted that the OCDS implies introduction of an open data standard for publication of structured information on all stages of a contracting process: from planning to implementation.

OCDS sets out 4 levels for disclosure (3 main and 1 additional: 1) basic; 2) intermediate; 3) advanced; and 4) additional. The PPA intends to meet the standards of the 3rd and 4th levels in accordance with OCDS.

Currently, the works of the Stage 1 have been completed to ensure the OCDS introduction, which implies regular disclosure of the available information about both the aggregated and individual purchases in the special machine readable format (JSON) on a specially made new web-page.

At the Stage 2, the PPA plans further extension of the OCDS, which implies disclosure annual purchase plan of purchasing organizations in a special machine readable format, also the creation for the authorized users for direct access to the direct database the application of program interface (API) and creation of web-page of new visualization.

Commitment 13: Electronic innovations for more transparency and efficiency of public procurement
Lead Agency LEPL – Public Procurement Agency (PPA)
Other Involved Actors Public Agency
Civil Society / Private Sector /International organization
Issues to be Addressed Public procurement information is open to any stakeholder. Information is posted in a unified electronic system of public procurement, although it should be mentioned that the collection of necessary data is not automated and requires significant human resource and new data processing tools.
Main Objective Further development of the level of transparency and free and simplified access to information. This information will be usable by all economic operators, also for the civil society concerned. This will simplify planning of business and the public finances monitoring process.

OGP Principles Transparency Accountability Civil Participation Technology and Innovation
   

Milestones to Fulfill the Commitment New or ongoing commitment Start date End date
Transfer of the current year information available in the module of public procurement electronic annual plans built in the e-procurement system and disclosure on the web-page - opendata.spa.ge Ongoing December 2018
January 2019

Creation of a web-page of new visualization on the database generated by OCDS (the new web-page will assist users in retrieving desired information in any correlation) Ongoing March 2018 December 2018
Creation of an API for accessing OCDS-based database Ongoing July 2018 December 2018
Ensuring rather detailed (minimum of the second level) instructions of the CPV codes in electronic tenders of the E-Procurement system. Ongoing May 2018 December 2018
OCDS-based database update; complete coverage of historical data created since 2011 and systemic update of current data. Ongoing January 2018 December 2019
(ongoing regularly)
Indicator The new web-page of e-tenders data visualization and the application of program interface (API) have been developed. The data are published/disclosed in accordance with OCDS – the Public Procurement Agency completely meets Level 3 of the OCDS.

IRM Midterm Status Summary

Commitment 13: Electronic Innovations for More Transparency and Efficiency of Public Procurement

Language of the commitment as it appears in the action plan:

“The Public Procurement Agency (PPA), with the support of the World Bank (WB) and the Department of International Development (DFID), also in cooperation with the Open Contracting Partnership (OCP) actively works on the introduction of the Open Contracting Data Standard (OCDS). It should be noted that the OCDS implies introduction of an open data standard for publication of structured information on all stages of a contracting process: from planning to implementation.

OCDS sets out 4 levels for disclosure (3 main and 1 additional: 1) basic; 2) intermediate; 3) advanced; and 4) additional. The PPA intends to meet the standards of the 3rd and 4th levels in accordance with OCDS.

Currently, the works of the Stage 1 have been completed to ensure the OCDS introduction, which implies regular disclosure of the available information about both the aggregate and individual purchases in the special machine-readable format (JSON) on a specially made new webpage.

At the Stage 2, the PPA plans further extension of the OCDS, which implies disclosure annual purchase plan of purchasing organizations in a special machine readable format, also the creation for the authorized users for direct access to the direct database the application program interface (API) and creation of web-page of new visualization”

Milestones: 

  1. Transfer of the current year information available in the module of public procurement electronic annual plans built in the e-procurement system and disclosure on the web-page - opendata.spa.ge 
  2. Creation of a web-page of new visualization on the database generated by OCDS (the new web-page will assist users in retrieving desired information in any correlation
  3. Creation of an API for accessing OCDS-based database
  4. Ensuring rather detailed (minimum of the second level) instructions of the CPV codes in electronic tenders of the E-Procurement system. 
  5. OCDS-based database update; complete coverage of historical data created since 2011 and systemic update of current data

Start Date: December 2018

End Date: December 2019

Editorial note: For the full text of this commitment, please see https://www.opengovpartnership.org/documents/georgia-action-plan-2018-2019/.

Context and Objectives

This commitment continues the goals of Commitment 15 from Georgia’s third action plan (2016–2017). During the third action plan, the State Procurement Agency (SPA) launched the http://www.opendata.spa.ge portal, where it published aggregated and detailed data on tenders in an open data format. This portal was designed to better comply with open contracting requirements and make tender data more easily accessible to the public.

With the fourth action plan’s commitment, the SPA plans to integrate the e-Plan modules and annual procurement plans of procuring entities into the opendata.spa.ge portal and publish this information in an open data format. It also aims to publish more details on the tenders, add more filters for deeper analysis, and provide complete historical data (from 2011 to the present). Finally, the SPA plans to provide an application programming interface (API) to registered users of its opendata.spa.ge portal and redesign the portal to align it better with the Open Contracting Data Standard. [68]

This commitment responds to civil society critiques of the new database that surfaced during the previous action plan. They noted insufficient filters to allow for deeper analysis of the content and the lack of an API for interested organizations to link their portals to the new SPA webpage. Several stakeholders also called for transferring and publishing procurement data in a machine-readable and open data format to enable users to disaggregate data by different variables. [69] [70] The goal of improving the availability and usability of procurement data makes the commitment relevant to the OGP value of access to information. This commitment is specific enough to be verified. It provides measurable milestones and outputs that are aligned with the commitment’s objective.

As one more step taken toward opening procurement data to the public, this commitment can be considered a progressive and incremental improvement to the well-functioning system. The full implementation of this commitment could help improve the accessibility and transparency of procurement information. It could also improve the ability of the public and civil society organizations to monitor government spending. [71] In particular, procurement information could become more accessible for the public—regular citizens—and not only for the organizations and experts who have relevant expertise. [72]

However, an interviewed Transparency International–Georgia representative pointed out that although publishing data in a machine-readable format is a step forward, there are many important issues that this commitment does not address. For example, the annual procurement plan is currently not detailed enough to provide specific information of interest, such as detailed CPV codes. More importantly, annual plans change often and thus make the business process unpredictable for interested parties. [73]

Next steps

Moving forward, the IRM researcher recommends that the State Procurement Agency (SPA) continue publishing more detailed information to the http://www.opendata.spa.ge platform. For example, the Institute for Development of Freedom of Information (IDFI) has recently recommended that SPA publish detailed CPV codes of the specific goods or services procured. [74] The IRM researcher also reiterates another IDFI recommendation to amend Georgia’s public procurement legislation to include publishing information on subcontractors. This would help close loopholes in the existing information and prevent blacklisted companies from participating in procurement.

[68] Open Contracting Partnership, Guide to Defining Open Contracting Data Standard Functional Requirements for Electronic Government Procurement Systems, 2018, https://bit.ly/32iny8C.

[69] Open Government Partnership, IRM: Georgia Progress Report 2016–2017, https://bit.ly/2XKZWpP.

[70] Institute for Development of Freedom of Information, Implementation Assessment of the Georgian Public Procurement Legislation, 2017, https://bit.ly/2GdAjI6.

[71] Saba Buadze, former Anti-Corruption Direction Lead, Institute for Development of Freedom of Information, interview with IRM researcher, 22 May 2019.

[72] IRM researcher’s focus group discussion with experts, researchers, and master’s students of public administration, 18 June 2018.

[73] Giorgi Topuria, Senior Analyst at Transparency International–Georgia, interview with IRM researcher, 22 May 2019.

[74] IDFI, “Implementation Assessment of the Georgian Public Procurement Legislation,” 15 May 2017, https://bit.ly/2Q8mgZg


Commitments

  1. Improved Public Services

    GE0066, 2018, Capacity Building

  2. Citizen Engagement Platform

    GE0067, 2018, Capacity Building

  3. Unified Authentication System

    GE0068, 2018, E-Government

  4. Economic Governance

    GE0069, 2018, E-Government

  5. Environment Portal

    GE0070, 2018, E-Government

  6. Strengthen Anti-Corruption Institutions

    GE0071, 2018, Anti-Corruption

  7. Monitor SDGs

    GE0072, 2018, Capacity Building

  8. Citizen Engagement Legislation

    GE0073, 2018, Legislation & Regulation

  9. Publish Court Decisions

    GE0074, 2018, E-Government

  10. Increasing Transparency of the Ministry of Internal Affairs

    GE0075, 2018, E-Government

  11. Citizen Participation in Public Finance

    GE0076, 2018, Anti-Corruption

  12. Transparent Public Funding System

    GE0077, 2018, Fiscal Openness

  13. Public Procurement Improvements

    GE0078, 2018, Access to Information

  14. Housing Policy Planning

    GE0079, 2018, Land Rights and Spatial Planning

  15. Openness and Accountability of State-Owned Enterprises

    GE0080, 2018, E-Government

  16. Transparency and Good Governance

    GE0081, 2018, Legislation & Regulation

  17. Open Data Collection and Publication

    GE0082, 2018, Access to Information

  18. Participation for Disabled Individuals

    GE0083, 2018, Infrastructure & Transport

  19. Participatory Budgeting

    GE0084, 2018, Capacity Building

  20. Your Idea for the Zugdidi Mayor

    GE0085, 2018, Capacity Building

  21. Electronic Services

    GE0086, 2018, E-Government

  22. I. Gov. Zugdidi

    GE0087, 2018, Capacity Building

  23. Service and Citizen Satisfaction Assessment

    GE0088, 2018, Capacity Building

  24. Promoting and Monitoring SDGs

    GE0089, 2018, Legislative

  25. Citizen Involvement in Budget

    GE0090, 2018, E-Government

  26. Technology for Transparency

    GE0091, 2018, E-Government

  27. Citizen Engagement Center

    GE0092, 2018, Capacity Building

  28. Raising Public Awareness About Parliamentary Democracy

    GE0093, 2018, E-Government

  29. Electronic Innovations for More Transparency and Efficiency of Public Procurement

    GE0056, 2016, Anti-Corruption

  30. Starred commitment Adoption of the Environmental Assessment Code

    GE0057, 2016, Anti-Corruption

  31. Introduction of a Mobile App as an Alternative Channel to Connect to “112”

    GE0058, 2016, E-Government

  32. Development of Local Councils for Crime Prevention

    GE0059, 2016, Justice

  33. Development of a Guidebook for Economic Agents

    GE0060, 2016, Capacity Building

  34. Development and Introduction of the Quality Control Program of Commercial Service

    GE0061, 2016, Capacity Building

  35. Presentation of Company Reports in an Electronic Form and Provision of Their Accessibility

    GE0062, 2016, Capacity Building

  36. Introduction of an Electronic Petition Portal and “Zugdidi-INFO” on the Webpage of Zugdidi Municipality Assembly

    GE0063, 2016, Capacity Building

  37. Transparency of Ozurgeti Municipality Assembly Meetings

    GE0064, 2016, Capacity Building

  38. Creation of Electronic Mechanism for Local Budget Planning in Kutaisi, Ozurgeti, Batumi and Akhaltsikhe

    GE0065, 2016, E-Government

  39. Adapting the Public Service Hall to the Needs of the People with Disabilities

    GE0042, 2016, Capacity Building

  40. Launch of the Unified Healthcare System Information Portal

    GE0043, 2016, Capacity Building

  41. Introduction of Electronic Licensing System in the Field of Natural Resources Application

    GE0044, 2016, Anti-Corruption

  42. Creation of Spatial (Geographic) Data Web-Portal for the Energy Sector

    GE0045, 2016, Capacity Building

  43. Creation of Innovation Ecosystem

    GE0046, 2016, Capacity Building

  44. Electronic Portal for Registering and Disposal of State Property – Customer’S Module

    GE0047, 2016, E-Government

  45. Development of the Freedom of Information Law

    GE0048, 2016, Access to Information

  46. Development of a Monitoring and Assessment System of the Government Policy and Legislative Acts

    GE0049, 2016, Capacity Building

  47. Starred commitment Introduction of the Public Officials’ Asset Declarations Monitoring System

    GE0050, 2016, Anti-Corruption

  48. Establishing Unified Regulations to Publish Court Decisions

    GE0051, 2016, Judiciary

  49. Development of Transparency and Integrity Strategy and Action Plan in the Field of Regional Development and Infrastructure

    GE0052, 2016, Capacity Building

  50. Improvement of the Database of the Convicted and Transfer of the Penitentiary Department Entirely Onto the Electronic Workflow Management

    GE0053, 2016, Capacity Building

  51. Publication of Phone Tapping Data According to the Nature of the Crime and Geographic Area

    GE0054, 2016, E-Government

  52. Starred commitment Increasing Citizen Participation in Supervision of Public Finances (Public Audit)

    GE0055, 2016, Capacity Building

  53. "Voice of the Consumer"

    GE0013, 2014, Public Participation

  54. JUSTdrive

    GE0014, 2014, Public Service Delivery

  55. Educational Services

    GE0015, 2014, Education

  56. Citizen's Portal (Www.Mygov.Ge)

    GE0016, 2014, Capacity Building

  57. Transformation of Public Libraries for Regional Development

    GE0017, 2014, Capacity Building

  58. Digital Signature and Online Authentication

    GE0018, 2014, E-Government

  59. Open Data Portal (Data.Gov.Ge)

    GE0019, 2014, Access to Information

  60. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Draft

    GE0020, 2014, Access to Information

  61. Georgia's OGP Forum

    GE0021, 2014, Public Participation

  62. I-Change.Ge

    GE0022, 2014, E-Government

  63. Transparency of Public Service Recruitment

    GE0023, 2014, E-Government

  64. Asset Declaration Monitoring System

    GE0024, 2014, Anti-Corruption

  65. Starred commitment Political Party Financial Declarations

    GE0025, 2014, Access to Information

  66. Accessibility of Ministry of Interior's Webpage to People with Special Needs

    GE0026, 2014, E-Government

  67. Starred commitment Proactive Publishing of Surveillance Data

    GE0027, 2014, Civic Space

  68. Public Awareness of the Electoral Process

    GE0028, 2014, Capacity Building

  69. Transparency of Budgetary Processes

    GE0029, 2014, E-Government

  70. Electronic System of Procurement

    GE0030, 2014, Anti-Corruption

  71. Digital Human Resource Management System

    GE0031, 2014, E-Government

  72. Digital Preservation System: E-Archive

    GE0032, 2014, E-Government

  73. Openness and Accessibility of National Archives

    GE0033, 2014, E-Government

  74. Electronic Catalogues of Ministry of Internal Affairs (MIA) Archives

    GE0034, 2014, E-Government

  75. Public Finance Management System

    GE0035, 2014, E-Government

  76. Alternative Channels to "112"

    GE0036, 2014, E-Government

  77. Interactive Statistics and Crime Mapping

    GE0037, 2014, E-Government

  78. Travel Insurance Services

    GE0038, 2014, Citizenship & Immigration

  79. State Property Registration

    GE0039, 2014, Public Service Delivery

  80. Development of Community Centers in Georgia

    GE0040, 2014, E-Government

  81. Introduction of e-Governance in Local Self-Governments

    GE0041, 2014, E-Government

  82. Public Service Hall-Hub of Public Services

    GE0001, 2012, Access to Justice

  83. e-Governance in Local Governments

    GE0002, 2012, E-Government

  84. Citizens’ Portal

    GE0003, 2012, E-Government

  85. Easily Accessible and Better Healthcare

    GE0004, 2012, E-Government

  86. Launch Ichange.Ge and Data.Gov.Ge

    GE0005, 2012, E-Government

  87. Platform for Participating in the Legislative Process

    GE0006, 2012, E-Government

  88. Citizens and Justice

    GE0007, 2012, Access to Justice

  89. Starred commitment Transparent Party Financing

    GE0008, 2012, Political Integrity

  90. Home-Grown Concept of E-Procurement

    GE0009, 2012, Anti-Corruption

  91. e-Declarations

    GE0010, 2012, Anti-Corruption

  92. Technology Cares for Safety: ICCMS, Crime Mapping, and Safety in Your Neighbourhood

    GE0011, 2012, E-Government

  93. NGO Forum

    GE0012, 2012, Capacity Building

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