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Sierra Leone

Waste Management (SL0014)

Overview

At-a-Glance

Action Plan: Sierra Leone National Action Plan 2016-2018

Action Plan Cycle: 2016

Status: Inactive

Institutions

Lead Institution: Freetown City Council

Support Institution(s): Ministry of Local Government, Ministry of Youth Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Road Maintenance Fund; Masada Waste Management Company Health Committee in Freetown City Council National Youth Coalition Network Movement for Youth and Children Welfare Campaign for Good Governance

Policy Areas

Capacity Building, Infrastructure & Transport, Public Participation, Public Service Delivery, Subnational, Water and Sanitation

IRM Review

IRM Report: Sierra Leone Mid-Term Report 2016-2018

Starred: No

Early Results: Pending IRM Review

Design i

Verifiable: Yes

Relevant to OGP Values: Access to Information Civic Participation

Potential Impact:

Implementation i

Completion:

Description

Status quo or problem/ issue to be addressed
Continued filth in the city with no clear authority on which agency should take action on where waste should be deposited, collected and disposed of.
Main objective
Establish structures to address waste management issues in Freetown
Brief Description of Commitment (140 character limit)
The governance around waste management in the city is uncoordinated with lack of information on the roles of the various stakeholders. The resultant effect is continued filth posing a serious challenge for diseases such as malaria and cholera and the circumstances even worrying in the aftermath of Ebola. This situation has been persistent even when a private company MASADA has been contracted and operating for two years to clear the waste in the city and transform it to fertilizer and gas. Government of Sierra Leone is paying huge sums of money without citizens receiving the required services. As Sierra Leone moves to the Ebola recovery phase of its development planning process it becomes necessary that a clear policy around waste management is formulated in the city; detailing specific roles of key institutions, companies and players in order to ensure clear lines of accountability on the delivery of services.

The commitment will ensure the development of an implementation strategy which will serve as a roll out plan with clear deliverables and timelines that will be made available to the public through education so that both citizens and Agencies will be clear on their duties and responsibilities

IRM Midterm Status Summary

3. Waste Management

Commitment Text:

The governance around waste management in the city is uncoordinated with lack of information on the roles of the various stakeholders. The resultant effect is continued filth posing a serious challenge for diseases such as malaria and cholera and the circumstances even worrying in the aftermath of Ebola. This situation has been persistent even when a private company MASADA has been contracted and operating for two years to clear the waste in the city and transform it to fertilizer and gas. Government of Sierra Leone is paying huge sums of money without citizens receiving the required services. As Sierra Leone moves to the Ebola recovery phase of its development planning process it becomes necessary that a clear policy around waste management is formulated in the city; detailing specific roles of key institutions, companies and players in order to ensure clear lines of accountability on the delivery of services.

The commitment will ensure the development of an implementation strategy which will serve as a roll out plan with clear deliverables and timelines that will be made available to the public through education so that both citizens and Agencies will be clear on their duties and responsibilities.

Milestones: Review of existing Waste Management Contract and report on the effectiveness of the present Waste Management Process in the Freetown City Council. Engage local communities/general public to determine a most effective way for Waste Collection through community meetings and media outreach programs involving Civil Society, Ward Development Committee and Tribal Authorities, Freetown residents and responsible agencies. Development of a Comprehensive Waste Management Policy and implementation strategy with Waste Management Authorities, Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Local Councils and private Company outlining clear roles and responsibilities. It should also include responsibility for Waste Management Company to transform waste. Popularize the new policy and implementation strategy at local communities and the national level. Ministry of Health to train and Deploy 50 Sanitary officers in the City. Create Citizens Education Programmes on 'Keep the City Clean' theme; Conduct annual assessment of the effectiveness of the implementation of the new policy and implementation strategy for waste management.

Responsible institution: Freetown City Council

Supporting institution(s): Ministry of Local Government, Ministry of Youth, Ministry of Health, Road Maintenance Fund, Masada Waste Management Company, National Youth Coalition, Campaign for Good Governance, Network Movement for Youth and Children Welfare.

Start date: July 2016 End date: June 2018

Context and Objectives

Management of municipal waste in Sierra Leone’s capital Freetown has been a problem for decades, but has been exacerbated in the past few years due to rapid urbanisation, high unemployment and the Ebola crisis.[Note68: Waste Management Situational Analysis, http://www.washlearningsl.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Waste-Management-in-Freetown-Final-report-2013.pdf ] Masada Waste Management Company holds the current contract with Freetown City Council as the primary waste management company, however, Freetown City Council (FCC) has expressed concern over bad performance.[Note69: Minutes of the Steering Committee meeting, 9 February 2017.] Further challenges stem from the lack of coordination of waste management services. There is an unclear relationship between the city council, private sector contractors, and the central government. By law, the municipal government is responsible for keeping the city clean. Even though the municipal government uses both private contractors as well as their own workers to do the same job, private businesses also collect household garbage for a fee. In an effort to coordinate services, the Ministry of Health and Sanitation developed a National Policy Roadmap on Integrated Waste Management in 2015 outlining clear roles and responsibilities.[Note70: National Policy Roadmap on Integrated Waste Management, washlearningsl.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/RWA-SL-Roadmap-Policy-Final-20150316.pdf] The Presidential Recovery Priorities have brought additional attention to this area in an effort to enhance delivery of social services under a post-Ebola recovery programme initiated in 2015.[Note71: The President’s Recovery Priorities, http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/767c32_5cefbb0c2b184caeb0d97809957709f5.pdf]

This commitment aims to enhance the existing efforts through activities that help to solidify and establish structures to address waste management issues involving a range of stakeholders. The milestone to engage communities on the best ways to manage waste is relevant to civic participation as a result of the public involvement activities. The milestone to popularise a new waste management policy is relevant to access to information, given that the existing waste management policy has never been published as a public document. If implemented in its entirety, this commitment could be a major step forward on changing the government practice on waste management.

Completion

Under the Presidential Recovery Priorities to support Ebola efforts, Operation Clean Freetown began in May 2017 to address the waste problem in the city.[Note72: Operation Clean Freetown, http://www.presidentsrecoverypriorities.gov.sl/operation-clean-freetown] It incorporates several activities outlined in this commitment such as engaging civil society with waste collection, conducting stakeholder engagement with local communities, and training sanitary workers. There has been no explicit information provided by the government that links this initiative with this commitment. Civil society stakeholders including leadership at Masada Waste Management were unaware of any additional efforts made outside of Operation Clean Freetown.[Note73: Views from participants at the civil society stakeholder meeting of 20 October 2017; and IRM researcher’s interview of the Executive Director (Masada Waste Management Company), November 2017.] Activities completed under this programme such as the stakeholder meetings, deployment of sanitary workers and popularisation of waste management through citizen education can be considered completed as they relate to this commitment.[Note74: The President’s Recovery Priorities ran from April 2016 to June 2017, www.presidentsrecoverypriorities.gov.sl] The OGP Coordinator, the head of the Masada Waste Management company and civil society participants at the stakeholder meeting held on 20 October 2017, agreed that the activities under Operation Clean Freetown were implemented in a satisfactory manner.

The head of the Masada Waste Management Company shared that an assessment of their current contract has not been done despite the company’s interest in getting feedback on their performance.[Note75: IRM researcher’s interview of the Executive Director (Masada Waste Management Company), November 2017.] An official of the FCC told a meeting of the Steering Committee that the Masada Waste Management Company had defaulted on some of the terms of their contract, and therefore a decision had been taken to terminate the company’s contract.

The researcher was unable to get evidence, neither from FCC nor from the OGP Secretariat, as to whether what the official said came from the findings of an assessment. In an interview with the researcher, the head of the company said no formal assessment of her company’s performance had been done. The researcher did not come across a new waste management policy as part of the implementation of the commitment.

Early Results (if any)

Stakeholders interviewed say the city is cleaner than it was a year ago. However, they say it can be attributed to the special ad hoc arrangement made under the government’s post-Ebola recovery programme. According to the head of the waste management company, the deployment of sanitary officers, the public education and mobilisation activities, and the use of youth groups to collect waste for fees are early results specifically from Operation Clean Freetown.[Note76: Awoko, Operation Clean Freetown, http://awoko.org/2017/05/17/sierra-leone-news-operation-clean-freetown-50-youths-to-starts-work/ ] One CSO leader told the researcher that while the city is cleaner, the President’s Recovery Priorities, the establishment of youth groups, and the unresolved problem of Masada’s contract, have brought more confusion over the management of waste in general.[Note77: IRM researcher’s interview of the Executive Director of Transparency International, 6 November 2017. ]

Next Steps

Given that Operation Freetown was not explicitly connected to this commitment, a future commitment needs to have clear coordination with existing programmes and identify ways to enhance it rather than commit to similar actions.

The commitment could be further enhanced with additional actions related to civic participation to engage civil society in the governmental strategic planning for this issue and articulate authority and ownership to ensure public accountability.


Sierra Leone's Commitments

  1. Gender

    SL0012, 2016, Capacity Building

  2. Foriegn Aid Transparency

    SL0013, 2016, Aid

  3. Waste Management

    SL0014, 2016, Capacity Building

  4. Fiscal Transparency and Open Budget

    SL0015, 2016, E-Government

  5. Audit Report

    SL0016, 2016, Audits and Controls

  6. Climate Change

    SL0017, 2016, Capacity Building

  7. Elections

    SL0018, 2016, E-Government

  8. Record Archive Management

    SL0019, 2016, E-Government

  9. Access to Justice

    SL0020, 2016, Capacity Building

  10. Open Public Procurement Contracting

    SL0021, 2016, Anti-Corruption Institutions

  11. Publish and Revise 70% of Mining and Agricultural Lease Agreements and Contracts

    SL0009, 2014, E-Government

  12. Starred commitment Right to Access Information Law

    SL0010, 2014, Capacity Building

  13. Open Data Portal for Transparency in Fiscal and Extractive Transactions

    SL0011, 2014, E-Government

  14. Public Integrity Pact with 5 Ministries, Departments, and Agencies

    SL0001, 2014, Conflicts of Interest

  15. Archives and Records Management Act

    SL0002, 2014, E-Government

  16. Scale Up Performance Management and Service Delivery Directorate

    SL0003, 2014, Public Participation

  17. Compliance with Audit Measures

    SL0004, 2014, Audits and Controls

  18. Starred commitment Single Treasure Account

    SL0005, 2014, Extractive Industries

  19. Extractive Industry Revenue Act

    SL0006, 2014, Extractive Industries

  20. Scaling Up Extractive Industry Transparency Initiatives

    SL0007, 2014, Extractive Industries

  21. Local Content Policy (LCP) Linkages with MDAs

    SL0008, 2014, Capacity Building