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Canada

Support Openness and Transparency Initiatives around the World (CA0059)

Overview

At-a-Glance

Action Plan: Canada Action Plan 2016-2018

Action Plan Cycle: 2016

Status: Inactive

Institutions

Lead Institution: Global Affairs Canada, the International Development Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Support Institution(s): NA

Policy Areas

Aid, Capacity Building, E-Government, Health, Open Data, Records Management, Sustainable Development Goals

IRM Review

IRM Report: Canada End-Term Report 2016-2018, Canada Mid-Term Report 2016- 2018

Starred: No

Early Results: NR

Design i

Verifiable: Yes

Relevant to OGP Values: Access to Information Civic Participation , Public Accountability

Potential Impact:

Implementation i

Completion: NR

Description

Support Openness and Transparency Initiatives around the World Why do this: To ensure that the global open government movement is not restricted to the wealthiest or most technologically advanced governments, it is important to ensure that Canada continues to support peer knowledge exchange and capacity-building efforts. Citizens of all nations can benefit both socially and economically from open government, regardless of who they are or where they live. How will it be done: Under Canada’s first two Action Plans, steps were taken to ensure greater transparency and quality of Canada’s international aid data. Canada worked with partners in the Open Data for Development (OD4D) network to build capacity around the world for ambitious open government initiatives to benefit citizens. By expanding these initiatives, and undertaking new leadership roles in support of the Open Government Partnership and the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI), Canada can help ensure citizens around the world have access to government information and opportunities to engage in public affairs. This will also facilitate the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals.

IRM Midterm Status Summary

18. Support Openness and Transparency Initiatives around the World

Commitment Text:

The Government of Canada will work with international partners to increase the transparency of international development funding, and to share skills and knowledge with developing countries to ensure that everyone can reap the benefits of open government.

Milestones:

18.1. Endorse the Open Government Partnership’s Joint Declaration on Open Government for the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and leverage Canada’s participation in the OGP to help support the declaration’s commitments.

18.2. Leverage Canada’s role as chair of the International Aid Transparency Initiative to support international good practices on aid transparency and greater interoperability among data standards (e.g., aid, public procurement, public accounts, corporate identifiers) to enable greater accountability and improve the effectiveness of development finance.

18.3. Provide training and peer-learning to at least 500 open data leaders in government and civil society in developing countries, provide technical assistance to at least 10 developing countries, increasing the quality and ambition of their open data policies, and assess how capacity-building activities affect communities.

18.4. Work with international organizations and partners in developing countries to implement innovative open data projects with impact on anti-corruption, local governance, health, and education.

18.5. In support of Canada’s role as a partner in the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN):

Increase the amount of high-value, reusable agriculture and nutrition data made available to Canadians in open formats under the Government of Canada’s open licence; and

Participate in the planning of the GODAN Summit in September 2016 in order to support the global agenda for opening agriculture and nutrition data around the world.

Responsible institutions: Global Affairs Canada; the International Development Research Centre; Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Supporting institutions: Open Government Partnership; International Aid Transparency Initiative; Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition; Open Data for Development and associated networks

Start date: Not specified

End date: Not specified

Editorial Note: The text of the commitment was abridged for formatting reasons. For full commitment text, visit: http://www.opengovpartnership.org/sites/default/files/Canada_AP3.pdf.

Context and Objectives
The government’s self-assessment states that the purpose of this commitment is to equip global governments and civil society with 'the knowledge, tools, and expertise needed to support greater public access to open data and information.'[Note150: Canada’s Third Biennial Plan to the Open Government Partnership 2016-2018 Mid-term Self-assessment Report, September 2017, https://www.opengovpartnership.org/sites/default/files/Canada_Mid-Term_Self-Assessment_2016-2018_EN.pdf, pg. 56. ] Although international collaboration is a main feature of the Open Government Partnership, OGP action plans are typically meant to focus domestically, rather than building other countries’ open government initiatives. Nonetheless, there are aspects of this commitment, particularly milestones 18.1 and 18.5, which have the potential to create a significant positive impact on Canada’s own openness. Moreover, international collaborations, as described in milestones 18.2 and 18.4, can have an ancillary positive impact on Canada, by developing new skills in implementing transparency policies and spurring creative thinking in how to solve challenges to openness. The milestones are reasonably specific, including several tangible benchmarks for success, and listing specific initiatives that Canada will join. However, in assessing the commitment, stakeholders at the IRM Halifax consultation noted that it was relatively modest as far as government development initiatives go and encouraged the government to think more ambitiously if outward-facing commitments are included in future action plans.[Note151: This consultation took place on 12 September 2017.] Some examples cited by the participants were to consider a scale larger than just 500 open data leaders (a relatively modest footprint for a global project), and to export Canadian expertise on access to information, particularly through connecting developing country officials with staff at the Office of the Information Commissioner.
Completion

For Milestone 18.1, consultation with the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Open Government team indicated that they consider the action plan itself to be an endorsement of the Joint Declaration on Open Government for the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, since the latter no longer includes a formal mechanism for endorsement (this was confirmed with OGP staff). In terms of follow through, the Treasury Board cites ongoing support for the International Open Data Charter and work with Global Affairs Canada to integrate open government principles into Canada’s implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and reporting. This could be considered substantial progress given the relatively vague and open-ended nature of the milestone.

Canada was elected the chair of the International Aid Transparency Initiative in March 2016. Over the course of the first year of this action plan, there were several developments including recruiting the World Health Organization,[Note152: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/world-health-organization-becomes-a-new-iati-publisher.] the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations,[Note153: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/fao-publishes-to-iati. ] USAID,[Note154: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/usaid. ] the International Organization for Migration,[Note155: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/international-organization-for-migration-joins-iati. ] the Netherlands Enterprise Agency,[Note156: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/netherlands-enterprise-agency-becomes-an-iati-member. ] the International Finance Corporation,[Note157: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/ifc-joins-iati. ] Agence Française de Développement,[Note158: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/agence-francaise-de-developpement-becomes-a-member-of-iati. ] and the Republic of Korea.[Note159: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/republic-of-korea-becomes-iatis-latest-publisher. ] Global Affairs Canada also launched a new Project Browser that provides access to its IATI data in a bilingual interface.[Note160: See: http://w05.international.gc.ca/projectbrowser-banqueprojets/?lang=eng. ] In September 2017, IATI expanded and improved its search portal.[Note161: See: http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/new-d-portal-search-features-to-improve-data-use. ] This is substantial progress toward completion for Milestone 18.2.

Open Data for Development (OD4D) conducted a range of activities during the first year of implementation related to Milestone 18.3, including a series of trainings through the School of Data training program,[Note162: Reporting for the trainings is available at: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_DxOK_q_jdweWwzamhRR3RxQ0E/view.] an Organization of American States training for 79 participants from 10 countries,[Note163: Reporting available (in Spanish) at: http://od4d.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/OAS-Jan-2017-Informe-Tecnico-Final-F.pdf.] and additional leadership support activities as part of a broader project across the global south.[Note164: Reporting available at: http://od4d.net/result/odi-final-technical-report-2016-strengthening-southern-open-data-leadership/.] This represents substantial progress toward completion, though it is difficult to see positive impacts on open government in Canada flowing from the deliverable as it is being executed.

Regarding Milestone 18.4, the Treasury Board and the International Development Research Centre cite several projects, including the Edo AgriHub in Nigeria,[Note165: 'Impact Series: Using Open Data for Economic Impact in Nigeria,' Open Data for Development, 7 June 2017. Available at: od4d.net/impact-series-using-open-data-for-economic-impact-in-nigeria/.] the Agriculture Open Data Package,[Note166: 'Result - Introducing the Agriculture Open Data Package – BETA version,' Open Data for Development, 24 April 2017. Available at: od4d.net/result/introducing-the-agriculture-open-data-package-beta-version/.] the Open Data Charter’s Open Up Guide for Corruption,[Note167: 'Open Up Guide: Using Open Data to Combat Corruption,' Open Data Charter, 18 May 2017. Available at: https://opendatacharter.net/resource/open-guide-using-open-data-combat-corruption/.] and a document on open data for climate change.[Note168: Available at: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1D_Hz7o4h6ZyHxJpCgZ54UUM-BcM-YSM-zxb0JIW9h4Y/edit.] This represents substantial progress toward this milestone’s completion, though again it is difficult to see direct benefits for Canadian openness as a result of this work.

For Milestone 18.5, according to the government’s self-assessment, 58 new datasets from Agriculture and Agri-food Canada were released onto the open data portal.[Note169: See: http://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset?organization=aafc-aac.] Open Data for Development, supported by International Development Research Centre, presented a session at the GODAN Summit, though this does not quite align with the milestone of participating in the Summit’s planning. As a result, the IRM researcher assesses progress toward implementation as limited, rather than substantial.

Overall, the commitment is on schedule to be completed.

Next Steps

There are many excellent projects which have occurred because of Canada’s support for Open Data for Development; these projects have had a strong impact on open data across the global south. However, there remains a question as to whether externally-focused work should be included in Canada’s action plan, since impact on open government in Canada will be negligible. This is an appropriate approach to Canada’s foreign aid planning, which should target external goals rather than prioritising projects which benefit Canadians. However, it is unclear whether this is the right approach for an open government action plan commitment.

Without discouraging this programming, if the government seeks to cite it in future OGP action plans, the IRM researcher recommends that projects have a more tangible connection to Canada with participation of Canadian agencies beyond the IDRC’s funding and oversight role. For example, Milestone 18.5 includes active collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. In response to queries from the IRM researcher, IDRC provided a list of projects they funded which included the integration of a role for Canadian government entities, including the ConDatos event in Costa Rica[Note170: See: https://condatos.org/.] and Red GEALC, a Network of e-Government Leaders of Latin America and the Caribbean.[Note171: See: http://www.redgealc.net/ (in Spanish).]

IRM End of Term Status Summary

18. Support Openness and Transparency Initiatives around the World

Commitment Text:

The Government of Canada will work with international partners to increase the transparency of international development funding, and to share skills and knowledge with developing countries to ensure that everyone can reap the benefits of open government.

Milestones:

18.1. Endorse the Open Government Partnership's Joint Declaration on Open Government for the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and leverage Canada's participation in the OGP to help support the declaration's commitments.

18.2. Leverage Canada's role as chair of the International Aid Transparency Initiative to support international good practices on aid transparency and greater interoperability among data standards (e.g., aid, public procurement, public accounts, corporate identifiers) to enable greater accountability and improve the effectiveness of development finance.

18.3. Provide training and peer-learning to at least 500 open data leaders in government and civil society in developing countries, provide technical assistance to at least 10 developing countries, increasing the quality and ambition of their open data policies, and assess how capacity-building activities affect communities.

18.4. Work with international organizations and partners in developing countries to implement innovative open data projects with impact on anti-corruption, local governance, health, and education.

18.5. In support of Canada's role as a partner in the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN):

Increase the amount of high-value, reusable agriculture and nutrition data made available to Canadians in open formats under the Government of Canada's open licence; and

Participate in the planning of the GODAN Summit in September 2016 in order to support the global agenda for opening agriculture and nutrition data around the world.

Responsible institutions:Global Affairs Canada; the International Development Research Centre; Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Supporting institutions: Open Government Partnership; International Aid Transparency Initiative; Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition; Open Data for Development and associated networks

Start Date: Not specified

End Date: Not specified

Editorial Note: The text of the commitment was abridged for formatting reasons. For full commitment text, visit http://www.opengovpartnership.org/sites/default/files/Canada_AP3.pdf.

Commitment Aim

This commitment aimed to equip global governments and civil society with the knowledge, tools, and expertise to support greater public access to open data and information. The commitment intended to achieve this through several international development mechanisms and programmes, including:

The OGP Joint Declaration on Open Government for the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development;

The International Aid Transparency Initiative;

A package of international open data training programmes in 10 countries;

Open data programming related to anti-corruption, local governance, health, and education; and

The Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition partnership.

Status

Midterm: Substantial

As of the midterm assessment, Canada had endorsed the Joint Declaration on Open Government for the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The government had also moved to support the Open Data Charter and to integrate open government principles into Canada's implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and reporting (18.1). Under Milestone 18.2, Canada executed many activities as part of its leadership of the International Aid Transparency Initiative. These activities included recruiting new participants and enhancing the data accessibility of Global Affairs Canada through the new Project Browser and search portal.[Note150: See “Project Browser,” Government of Canada, http://w05.international.gc.ca/projectbrowser-banqueprojets/?lang=eng; and “New d-Portal Search Features to Improve Data Use,” International Aid Transparency Initiative, http://www.aidtransparency.net/news/new-d-portal-search-features-to-improve-data-use.] The Open Data for Development (OD4D) served as the main vehicle for programming under Milestone 18.3. OD4D carried out a series of trainings through the School of Data training programme.[Note151: Reporting for the trainings is available at https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_DxOK_q_jdweWwzamhRR3RxQ0E/view.] It also conducted an Organisation of American States training for 79 participants from 10 countries[Note152: Reporting available in Spanish at http://od4d.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/OAS-Jan-2017-Informe-Tecnico-Final-F.pdf.] and additional leadership support activities as part of a broader project across the Global South.[Note153: Reporting available at http://od4d.net/result/odi-final-technical-report-2016-strengthening-southern-open-data-leadership/.]

The government's self-assessment cited several projects in connection with Milestone 18.4. These included the Edo AgriHub in Nigeria,[Note154: 'Impact Series: Using Open Data for Economic Impact in Nigeria,' Open Data for Development, 7 June 2017, od4d.net/impact-series-using-open-data-for-economic-impact-in-nigeria/. ] the Agriculture Open Data Package,[Note155: 'Result—Introducing the Agriculture Open Data Package—BETA version,' Open Data for Development, 24 April 2017, od4d.net/result/introducing-the-agriculture-open-data-package-beta-version/.] the Open Data Charter's Open Up Guide for Corruption,[Note156: 'Open Up Guide: Using Open Data to Combat Corruption,' Open Data Charter, 18 May 2017, https://opendatacharter.net/resource/open-guide-using-open-data-combat-corruption/.] and a document on open data for climate change.[Note157: Available at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1D_Hz7o4h6ZyHxJpCgZ54UUM-BcM-YSM-zxb0JIW9h4Y/edit.] Under Milestone 18.5, the government released 58 new datasets from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada onto the open data portal, and OD4D presented a session at the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition summit. However, this latter action does not quite align with the milestone language, which calls for participation in the summit's planning. According to the end-of-term self-assessment, the government did not participate in planning because it was too late in offering these resources.

End of term: Substantial

The government completed all of the milestones for this commitment, except participation in the planning of the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) summit.

Canada became a supporting co-chair of OGP Steering Committee on 1 October 2017. Its end-of-term self-assessment includes several priorities that Canada will aim to promote as part of this role. These priorities include gender equality and better tracking of programming results.[Note158: The self-assessment is available at https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/9da9faf5-deb1-48db-8f16-91055d942d65.] Under 18.2, the self-assessment points to Canada's role in chairing the 2017 International Aid Transparency Initiative's Members' Assembly. This role included advancing the publication of data published by organisations working in the development sector.[Note159: See “Membership,” International Aid Transparency Initiative, https://www.aidtransparency.net/governance/members-assembly/annual-members-assembly-meeting; and “Annual Reports,” International Aid Transparency Initiative, http://iatistandard.org/en/about/governance/annual-reports/.] Under Milestone 18.3, the self-assessment highlighted the International Development Research Centre's support for the 2017 Francophone African Conference on Open Data and Open Government as a major deliverable.[Note160: See “#CAFDO2017: The First Francophone African Conference on Open Data and Open Government,” Open Government Partnership, 15 June 2017, https://www.opengovpartnership.org/stories/cafdo2017-first-francophone-african-conference-on-open-data-and-open-government.] The assessment also noted the training and peer-learning opportunities provided to over 900 open data leaders in government and civil society in developing countries. In addition, the report noted the trainings and peer-learning opportunities provided to 14 governments through the Open Data for Development (OD4D) hubs. The details of these engagements were provided to the IRM researcher. OD4D also supported a session on best practices at the 2018 OGP Global Summit in Georgia. OD4D has also signed a memorandum of understanding with OGP to lead its strategic partnership on open data.[Note161: See “Open Government Partnership and the Open Data for Development Network Join Forces to Support Open Data Initiatives around the World,” Open Government Partnership, 10 May 2018, https://www.opengovpartnership.org/stories/open-government-partnership-and-open-data-development-network-join-forces-support-open-data.]

Under Milestone 18.4, the end-of-term self-assessment points to the development of three “open up packages”; support to five scaled applications in health, anti-corruption, and open education; and many other pilot projects.[Note162: Links or background material for this programming has been shared with the IRM researcher. See, for example, the 'Open Up Guide: Using Open Data to Combat Corruption' at https://open-data-charter.gitbook.io/open-up-guide-using-open-data-to-combat-corruption/; the “Government Open-Up Guide for Agriculture” at data-impact.com/agpack/; a description of open data programming for development in Nigeria at http://od4d.net/impact-series-using-open-data-for-economic-impact-in-nigeria/; and open data programming targeting open elections in Burkina Faso at od4d.net/burkina.] Over the second year of implementation, the number of new datasets from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada on the open data portal grew from 58 to 68 (18.5).[Note163: See “Open Government Portal,” Government of Canada, https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset?q=&organization=aafc-aac&sort=metadata_modified+desc. The figure comes from Canada's self-assessment. As of September 2018, there were 283 datasets from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada available through the portal. However, it is difficult to confirm the number uploaded over the course of this action plan.] The end-of-term self-assessment notes that Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada supported an additional discussion in September 2017, titled “Farmers Sharing Their Data with Scientists,” at the Research Data Alliance's Tenth Plenary Meeting in Montréal. GODAN sponsored the event.

Did It Open Government?

Access to Information: Major

Civic Participation: Marginal

Public Accountability: Marginal

This commitment includes several international development projects. Most involve partnerships between Canadian international development organisations and counterparts in the Global South. As noted in the midterm assessment, although international collaboration stands out as a main feature of OGP, this evaluation aims purely to assess the impact of commitments within Canada. As a consequence, a project which had a transformative effect on openness in the target country might be scored as having only marginal impact on open government in Canada.

In terms of access to information, there are some signs that Canada's leadership role within OGP has given greater priority to access to information programming in the country. There also exist indications of Canada's willingness to take a leadership role in global open government issues. Such leadership helps to better form the nexus between open government programming abroad and improved domestic practice. As a result, the coding for this commitment on access to information has been increased to major. However, civic participation and public accountability are coded as undergoing marginal effects. The outward-facing nature of this commitment makes those two values more difficult to assess domestically.

Carried Forward?

Canada's latest action plan has a strong emphasis on developing Canadian leadership internationally. Specifically, it focuses on feminist open government. The corresponding commitment, Commitment 10, includes substantial international components. The International Development Research Centre and Open Data for Development also play prominent roles in Commitment 10, on leadership and collaboration.


Canada's Commitments

  1. User-friendly open government

    CA0064, 2018, Capacity Building

  2. Financial transparency and accountability

    CA0065, 2018, E-Government

  3. Corporate transparency

    CA0066, 2018, Beneficial Ownership

  4. Digital government and services

    CA0067, 2018, Capacity Building

  5. Open science

    CA0068, 2018, Capacity Building

  6. Healthy democracy

    CA0069, 2018, E-Government

  7. Access to Information

    CA0070, 2018, Capacity Building

  8. Feminist and inclusive dialogue

    CA0071, 2018, Capacity Building

  9. Reconciliation and open government

    CA0072, 2018, Capacity Building

  10. Open government community

    CA0073, 2018, Capacity Building

  11. Enhance Access to Information

    CA0042, 2016, Legislation & Regulation

  12. Streamline Requests for Personal Information

    CA0043, 2016, E-Government

  13. Expand and Improve Open Data

    CA0044, 2016, E-Government

  14. Provide and Preserve Open Information

    CA0045, 2016, E-Government

  15. Define an Approach for Measuring Open Government Performance

    CA0046, 2016, Capacity Building

  16. Develop Open Government Skills across the Federal Public Service

    CA0047, 2016, Capacity Building

  17. Embed Transparency Requirements in the Federal Service Strategy

    CA0048, 2016, Capacity Building

  18. Enhance Access to Culture & Heritage Collections

    CA0049, 2016, Capacity Building

  19. Enhance Openness of Information on Government Spending and Procurement

    CA0050, 2016, Capacity Building

  20. Increase Transparency of Budget and Other Department of Finance Information

    CA0051, 2016, Capacity Building

  21. Starred commitment Increase Transparency of Grants and Contributions Funding

    CA0052, 2016, Capacity Building

  22. Improve Public Information on Canadian Corporations

    CA0053, 2016, E-Government

  23. Increase the Availability and Usability of Geospatial Data

    CA0054, 2016, Capacity Building

  24. Increase Openness of Federal Science Activities (Open Science)

    CA0055, 2016, Capacity Building

  25. Stimulate Innovation through Canada’s Open Data Exchange (ODX)

    CA0056, 2016, E-Government

  26. Align Open Data across Canada (Open Data Canada)

    CA0057, 2016, Capacity Building

  27. Implement the Extractives Sector Transparency Measures Act

    CA0058, 2016, Capacity Building

  28. Support Openness and Transparency Initiatives around the World

    CA0059, 2016, Aid

  29. Engage Civil Society on Open Government

    CA0060, 2016, Public Participation

  30. Enable Open Dialogue and Open Policy Making

    CA0061, 2016, Capacity Building

  31. Promote Open Government Globally

    CA0062, 2016, Capacity Building

  32. Engage Canadians to Improve Key Canada Revenue Agency Services

    CA0063, 2016, Fiscal Transparency

  33. Implement Directive on Open Government

    CA0030, 2014, Open Data

  34. Starred commitment Open Data Canada

    CA0031, 2014, Open Data

  35. Canadian Open Data Exchange (ODX)

    CA0032, 2014, Capacity Building

  36. Open Data for Development

    CA0033, 2014, Capacity Building

  37. Open Data Core Commitment

    CA0034, 2014, Open Data

  38. Starred commitment Open Science

    CA0035, 2014, Science & Technology

  39. Starred commitment Mandatory Reporting on Extractives

    CA0036, 2014, Extractive Industries

  40. Open Contracting

    CA0037, 2014, Open Contracting and Procurement

  41. Open Information on Budgets and Expenditures

    CA0038, 2014, Fiscal Transparency

  42. Digital Literacy

    CA0039, 2014, Capacity Building

  43. Open Information Core Commitment

    CA0040, 2014, Right to Information

  44. Consulting Canadians

    CA0041, 2014, Marginalized Communities

  45. Starred commitment International Aid Transparency Initiative: Publish plan to make CIDA activities available and accessible

    CA0010, 2012, Aid

  46. International Aid Transparency Initiative: Implement plan

    CA0011, 2012, Aid

  47. Opening Government of Canada Records: Increase access to archived federal documents at Library and Archives Canada

    CA0012, 2012, Records Management

  48. Opening Government of Canada Records: Issue new mandatory policy on document classification

    CA0013, 2012, Records Management

  49. Opening Government of Canada Records: Make classified information available online

    CA0014, 2012, E-Government

  50. GCDOCS: Deploy wave one of electronic record and document management solution

    CA0015, 2012, E-Government

  51. GCDOCS: Deploy across federal government

    CA0016, 2012, E-Government

  52. GCWEB: Develop consolidated web presence

    CA0017, 2012, E-Government

  53. GCWEB: Implement new platform

    CA0018, 2012, E-Government

  54. Data.gc.ca: Expand number of datasets available

    CA0019, 2012, E-Government

  55. Data.gc.ca: Implement data.gc.ca portal

    CA0020, 2012, E-Government

  56. Data.gc.ca: Improve standardization of data

    CA0021, 2012, E-Government

  57. Government of Canada Resource Management Data: Publish resource management and performance data

    CA0022, 2012, E-Government

  58. Government of Canada Resource Management Data: Enhance search and data tools

    CA0023, 2012, E-Government

  59. Consulting Canadians: Develop new platform for consultation

    CA0024, 2012, E-Government

  60. Consulting Canadians: Develop standard approach to use of social media

    CA0025, 2012, E-Government

  61. Consulting Canadians: Pilot a crowdsourcing initiative

    CA0026, 2012, E-Government

  62. Consulting Canadians: Enable use of common online tools

    CA0027, 2012, E-Government

  63. Open Regulation: Federal regulators to post forward regulatory plans

    CA0028, 2012, Legislation & Regulation

  64. Open Regulation: Simplify engagement activities

    CA0029, 2012, Legislation & Regulation

  65. Open Government Directive: Issue Directive on Open Government

    CA0001, 2012, E-Government

  66. Open Government Directive: Implement Directive on Open Government

    CA0002, 2012, E-Government

  67. Starred commitment Open Government Licence: Issue Open Government Licence

    CA0003, 2012, Legislation & Regulation

  68. Starred commitment Open Government Licence: Adopt Open Government Licence

    CA0004, 2012, Records Management

  69. Modernising Administration of Access to Information: Pilot of online request and payment service

    CA0005, 2012, Fiscal Transparency

  70. Modernising Administration of Access to Information: Implement ATI Solution

    CA0006, 2012, Fiscal Transparency

  71. Modernising Administration of Access to Information: Make completed ATI request summaries searchable

    CA0007, 2012, Right to Information

  72. Virtual Library: Begin design of virtual library

    CA0008, 2012, E-Government

  73. Virtual Library: Launch virtual library

    CA0009, 2012, E-Government