Skip Navigation
Ukraine

Infrastructure data portal (UA0070)

Overview

At-a-Glance

Action Plan: Ukraine Third National Action Plan 2016-2018

Action Plan Cycle: 2018

Status: Active

Institutions

Lead Institution: MinInfrastructure Ministry of Economic Development and Trade (MoE) Ukravtodor (State Road Agency)

Support Institution(s): Transparency International Ukraine, Government-Civic Initiative “Together against Corruption,” CoST Advisory Group, UNDP in Ukraine, USAID and UK aid-funded Transparency and Accountability in Public Administration and Services Program/TAPAS, Other CSOs and international organizations (upon their consent)

Policy Areas

E-Government, Infrastructure & Transport, Open Contracting and Procurement, Public Service Delivery

IRM Review

IRM Report: Pending IRM Review

Starred: Pending IRM Review

Early Results: Pending IRM Review

Design i

Verifiable: Pending IRM Review

Relevant to OGP Values: Not Relevant

Potential Impact: Pending IRM Review

Implementation i

Completion: Pending IRM Review

Description

Introducing international standards on information disclosure of the Construction Sector Transparency Initiative (CoST) in the Ministry of Infrastructure and publishing disclosed information at the infrastructure data public portal Implementation of an infrastructure project such as construction and repair of roads, construction of engineering networks, port infrastructure facilities is a complex process entailing excessive cost and high risks of corruption and poor management. The CMU has planned large-scale work on the restoration of transport infrastructure. The State Programme for the Development of Motor Roads by 2022 envisages investing UAH 300 billion in the road network. In general, the National Transport Strategy of Ukraine until 2030 provides for investments in infrastructure up to USD 65 billion. Information on the procurement tenders on infrastructure projects in terms of their individual stages/elements, as well as tender results, is freely accessible at ProZorro Electronic Public Procurement portal. However, the information on planning and implementation and quality control phase is yet to be opened. It will simplify monitoring of infrastructure projects. Infrastructure data public portal is meant to unite all necessary information in one data set that will ease analysis and getting information on an infrastructure project. The portal will be based on international infrastructure data standard of CoST and OCDS standard. CoST IDS standard entails that an infrastructure project should be monitored at all stages of project implementation – from making a decision to support a project and project planning all the way the warranty period end. The standard provides for merging information on all contracts that relate to an infrastructure project in one dataset. Actions Responsible Timeframe Partners Indicator 1. Publishing data at the infrastructure data public portal MinInfrastructure Ministry of Economic Development and Trade (MoE) Ukravtodor (State Road Agency) December 2018 – March 2019 Transparency International Ukraine, Government-Civic Initiative “Together against Corruption,” CoST Advisory Group, UNDP in Ukraine, USAID and UK aid-funded Transparency and Accountability in Public Administration and Services Program/TAPAS, Other CSOs and international organizations (upon their consent) Data on the repair of the roads of national importance are published at the infrastructure data public portal 4 2. Scaling-up information disclosure standards to new infrastructure projects (except for the roads) -//- January – December 2019 -//- Information on implementation of 2-4 infrastructure projects (except for the roads) by 1-2 companies subordinated to the MinInfrastructure is disclosed 3. Institutionalization of information disclosure standards on infrastructure projects MinInfrastructure MoE State Road Agency July 2019 – July 2020 Transparency International Ukraine, Government-Civic Initiative “Together against Corruption,” CoST Advisory Group, UNDP in Ukraine, USAID and UK aid-funded Transparency and Accountability in Public Administration and Services Program/TAPAS, Other CSOs and international organizations (upon their consent) CMU Resolution on amending the CMU Resolution # 835 as of 21.10.2015 adopted Expected results of this activity are having a convenient tool for civic monitoring of infrastructure projects (road repair, construction and repair of airports, sea/river port terminals, railway stations, railroads, etc.) and analysis of market openness and useful statistics on infrastructure project development, level of competition, etc.

IRM Midterm Status Summary

10. Introduce public monitoring of the state of the environment

Commitment Text:

Introduction of public monitoring of the state of the environment.

Expected results: Creation of an open list of the largest polluters in the regions as part of the development of a national automated environmental data system. Creation of an electronic system for monitoring radiation safety and environmental threats.

Responsible institutions: Ministry of the Environment, State Agency for Administration of the Exclusion Zone, Regional and Kyiv Municipal State administrations.

Supporting institutions: Civil society institutions and international organizations (by consent).

Start date: December 2016 End date: July 2018

Context and Objectives

Ukraine faces many environmental challenges, including air pollution, quality of water resources, land degradation, solid waste management, and human health issues associated with environmental risk factors.[Note257: International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank, Ukraine Country Environmental Analysis, January 2016, http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/327881470142199866/pdf/AUS16696-WP-OUO-9-Ukraine-CEA-has-been-approved-P151337.pdf.] Another environmental problem lies in historic nuclear contamination from the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The accident affected one-tenth of Ukraine's land area and exposed approximately one million people to unhealthy levels of radiation through the consumption of unsafe food.[Note258: Ukraine - Environment, Nations Encyclopedia, http://www.nationsencyclopedia.com/Europe/Ukraine-ENVIRONMENT.html.] Pollution from other sources also poses a threat to the environment. Ukraine releases polluted water, heavy metal, organic compounds, and oil-related pollutants into the Black Sea. Thus, the water supply in some areas of the country contains toxic industrial chemicals at levels up to 10 times the concentration considered to be safe.[Note259: Ukraine - Environment, Nations Encyclopedia, http://www.nationsencyclopedia.com/Europe/Ukraine-ENVIRONMENT.html.]

Several government agencies hold responsibility for environmental monitoring. This includes the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources (MENR, referred to in the commitment text as the Ministry of the Environment). However, outdated equipment, lack of qualified personnel, and insufficient funding undermine the efficiency of their work.[Note260: International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank, Ukraine Country Environmental Analysis, January 2016, http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/327881470142199866/pdf/AUS16696-WP-OUO-9-Ukraine-CEA-has-been-approved-P151337.pdf.] For example, publicly accessible pollution data is significantly out of date. Even government representatives admit that there is no transparent mechanism to monitor the state of the environment in Ukraine.[Note261: Hennadii Dmytrenko (Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Ukraine), interview by IRM researcher, 22 August 2017.] Consequently, it is unclear which regions experience greater pollution. This knowledge gap complicates efforts to effectively distribute resources for mitigation or enact policy changes. It also keeps the public unnecessarily in the dark about environmental issues and dangers.

This commitment aims to address this problem by introducing public monitoring mechanisms. MENR committed to specifically publish an online, open list of the largest polluting industries by region. It will also develop a national, automated data system to track environmental indicators. This system would be paired with an electronic system to monitor spikes in unsafe radiation as well as other environmental threats. Some aspects of this commitment are more internally relevant to MENR. However, the publication of up-to-date environmental data improves both the quality and breadth of information available to the public. Thus, this commitment is relevant to the OGP value of access to information.

From the government perspective, the implementation of this commitment should increase the quality and accessibility of ecological information and open a positive dialogue between citizens and authorities. The government also expects it to eliminate grounds for abuse and corruption practices, harmonize national standards with international ones, and structure the exchange of ecological information. Lastly, through the commitment, the government anticipates fulfilling Ukraine's international environmental commitments and ensuring open ecological governance.[Note262: Hennadii Dmytrenko (Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Ukraine), interview by IRM researcher, 22 August 2017.] From the viewpoint of a civil society expert, a list and online map of polluters would allow civil society organizations to monitor the current environmental situation. They would also be able to use up-to-date information to appeal to companies to reduce pollution.[Note263: Antonina Yerysheva (Civic Energy), interview by IRM researcher, 28 July 2017.] If fully implemented, this commitment would have a moderate potential impact. It constitutes a major step forward in addressing environmental challenges. However, a more transformative commitment would identify clear mechanisms for monitoring. Furthermore, as written, the commitment lacks clarity on how it will directly lead to the harmonized standards and dialogue between citizens and authorities.

Completion

So far, the national list of polluters has been collected and published. The data portal and monitoring system are both still under construction. Overall, completion is limited.

The Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources (MENR) published a list of the top 100 polluters on its website in March 2016.[Note264: 'Information about Objects, Which Are the Biggest Atmosphere Polluters,' Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Ukraine, https://www.menr.gov.ua/files/docs/news/TOP_100.pdf.] The ministry edited the list once at the end of 2016.[Note265: 'Information about Objects, Which Are the Biggest Atmosphere Polluters,' Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Ukraine, http://data.gov.ua/passport/b348d687-40d6-4039-b346-171096fc6101.] The list identifies polluters based on one of three categories of pollution: water, air, and industrial waste.[Note266: Hennadii Dmytrenko (Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Ukraine), interview by IRM researcher, 22 August 2017.] Experts from environmental civil society groups have doubts about this list, however. They note that the full methodological criteria are not clear, the data is at least one year old, and there seems to be no continued monitoring activity taking place.[Note267: Antonina Yerysheva (Civic Energy), interview by IRM researcher, 28 July 2017.] A representative from MENR noted that the list is based on statistical information from other agencies and self-reporting by large firms. The representative admitted that information on ecological pollution remains incomplete, despite the compilation of the list.[Note268: Hennadii Dmytrenko (Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Ukraine), interview by IRM researcher, 22 August 2017.]

The MENR is currently drafting the basic conceptual design for the monitoring system. This process seems not to have any input from civil society. Because the drafting and design of the electronic systems outlined in the commitment are fully taking place inside MENR, assessment remains difficult. MENR has made at least 15 individual environmental datasets publicly accessible.[Note269: 'Open Data,' Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources, 14 July 2017, https://menr.gov.ua/news/31576.html.] So far, these have not been integrated into a single, automatic system, however. The government’s broad self-assessment suggests a design has been chosen for the proposed state automated system of updated environmental data, titled Ecology and Natural Resources. Little information is available beyond this.[Note270: 'The Interim Report on the Realization of the Action Plan for the Implementation of the Open Government Partnership Initiative in 2016–2018,' Civil Society and Authorities: Governmental Website, accessed 13 September 2017, (link no longer accessible as of 25 April 2018) http://civic.kmu.gov.ua/consult_mvc_kmu/uploads/attach-3467-910681586.doc. ]

Early Results

Regarding the published list of polluters, civil society representatives have criticized the veracity of the information provided. Also, the list’s current relevance remains a problem.[Note271: Antonina Yerysheva (Civic Energy), interview by IRM researcher, 28 July 2017.] The lack of a trustworthy methodological explanation hinders the ability of outside observers to assess the utility of the list.

Next Steps

To make the list of top polluters more credible and informative, the IRM researcher recommends that the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources (MENR) specify the methodological criteria for inclusion of enterprises. MENR should also update the information about pollution more regularly, ideally once every three months. To ensure that the pollution data is reliable, environmental civil society organizations could coordinate and develop an independent monitoring group to cross-check relevant pollution indicators.

Regarding the unreleased online monitoring system, the IRM researcher advises the government to continue and expand the system into a fully automated and comprehensive system. This should happen as soon as possible, given the potentially transformative nature of the commitment. A representative from MENR noted that the ministry hopes to widen and improve the functionality[Note272: Hennadii Dmytrenko (Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Ukraine), interview by IRM researcher, 22 August 2017.] of the system. In this task, MENR will take cues from Ukraine’s 2016 ratification of the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register.[Note273: 'The Law of Ukraine on Ratification of the Protocol on the Registry of Emissions and the Transfer of Pollutants,' The Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine, http://zakon0.rada.gov.ua/laws/show/980-19.] That register requires states to publish data from 65 different industries on air, water, and waste pollution, and to also publish data on off-site waste transfers.[Note274: 'The European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register,' European Commission, http://ec.europa.eu/environment/industry/stationary/eper/legislation.htm.] Furthermore, MENR should expand the number of publicly available open data. According to the ministry, 37 environmental datasets exist, although only 15 are accessible.[Note275: Hennadii Dmytrenko (Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources of Ukraine), interview by IRM researcher, 22 August 2017.]

Finally, the government needs to move beyond the two current governing strategic documents regarding the environment. These documents are the 2007 Concept Paper of the National Ecological Policy of Ukraine through 2020[Note276: 'The Regulation of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine on 17 October 2007 #880-p,' Legislation of Ukraine, the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine, http://zakon2.rada.gov.ua/laws/show/880-2007-%D1%80.] and the 2010 Strategy of the National Ecological Policy of Ukraine till 2020.[Note277: 'The Law of Ukraine on the Fundamentals (Strategy) of the National Ecological Policy of Ukraine till 2020,' Legislation of Ukraine, the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine, http://zakon3.rada.gov.ua/laws/show/2818-17.] The IRM researcher recommends that the MENR coordinates with civil society to develop an action plan for a new national ecological policy of Ukraine for 2019–2020. This can be done within the time frame of the next action plan.


Ukraine's Commitments

  1. Infrastructure data portal

    UA0070, 2018, E-Government

  2. open standard for e-system

    UA0071, 2018, E-Government

  3. Ensuring openness and transparency of selling public assets and property

    UA0072, 2018, E-Government

  4. Transparency in public procurement (Prozorro)

    UA0073, 2018, E-Government

  5. Awarenss raising about social and economic development

    UA0074, 2018, Aid

  6. e-calls for proposals to support CSOs

    UA0075, 2018, Civic Space

  7. Beneficial ownership registry

    UA0076, 2018, Beneficial Ownership

  8. Anti-corruption Training

    UA0077, 2018, Anti-Corruption Institutions

  9. Publishing environmental information

    UA0078, 2018, E-Government

  10. Database of natural resources

    UA0079, 2018, E-Government

  11. Interactive map of mines

    UA0080, 2018, E-Government

  12. Priority electronic services

    UA0081, 2018, Citizenship and Immigration

  13. online platform for executive bodies and CSOs

    UA0082, 2018, Civic Space

  14. EITI online data

    UA0083, 2018, E-Government

  15. electronic resources for education

    UA0084, 2018, E-Government

  16. online verification of education certificates

    UA0085, 2018, E-Government

  17. Free access to national repository for academic texts

    UA0086, 2018, E-Government

  18. Administrative Service Decentrilisation and Improvement

    UA0057, 2016, Capacity Building

  19. United State Portal Extension; Electronic Government Information Services Unification; Modern Tools for Electronic Identification

    UA0058, 2016, Capacity Building

  20. System for Entities Performing Government Functions

    UA0059, 2016, Capacity Building

  21. Free Urban Planning Documentation

    UA0060, 2016, E-Government

  22. Beneficial Ownership Verification System

    UA0061, 2016, Beneficial Ownership

  23. CoST Beneficial Ownership Standards

    UA0062, 2016, E-Government

  24. Transpartent Budget System

    UA0063, 2016,

  25. Starred commitment Open Public Procurement

    UA0064, 2016, Capacity Building

  26. Starred commitment Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

    UA0065, 2016, Extractive Industries

  27. Environmental Public Monitoring

    UA0066, 2016, Environment and Climate

  28. Community Policing System

    UA0067, 2016, Education

  29. Draft Law on Public Consultations

    UA0068, 2016, Legislation & Regulation

  30. Development of E-democracy.

    UA0069, 2016,

  31. Improve government rules on CSO involvement

    UA0031, 2014, E-Government

  32. Financing of charities

    UA0032, 2014, Civic Space

  33. Not-for-profit status for CSOs

    UA0033, 2014, Civic Space

  34. Public participation law

    UA0034, 2014, E-Government

  35. Establishing Rules on Processing Official Information

    UA0035, 2014, E-Government

  36. Access to Urban Planning Documents

    UA0036, 2014, E-Government

  37. Starred commitment Access to Communist-Era Archives

    UA0037, 2014, Legislation & Regulation

  38. Starred commitment Draft law on open data

    UA0038, 2014, Legislation & Regulation

  39. Starred commitment Supervisory mechanism for the right to information

    UA0039, 2014, Legislation & Regulation

  40. Compliance with EITI

    UA0040, 2014, Extractive Industries

  41. Monitoring of infrastructure projects

    UA0041, 2014, Anti-Corruption Institutions

  42. Adopt regional anti-corruption programmes

    UA0042, 2014, Anti-Corruption Institutions

  43. Corruption risk assessment methodology

    UA0043, 2014, Anti-Corruption Institutions

  44. Starred commitment Asset disclosure on a single web portal

    UA0044, 2014, Asset Disclosure

  45. Law on administrative procedure

    UA0045, 2014, Legislation & Regulation

  46. Law on streamlining payment of administrative fees

    UA0046, 2014, E-Government

  47. Administrative services portal

    UA0047, 2014, E-Government

  48. Draft law on decentralisation of administrative services

    UA0048, 2014, Legislation & Regulation

  49. Draft law on social services

    UA0049, 2014, E-Government

  50. e-Government laws

    UA0050, 2014, E-Government

  51. Electronic readiness assessment

    UA0051, 2014, E-Government

  52. Government regulations on open data

    UA0052, 2014, E-Government

  53. Electronic democracy development roadmap

    UA0053, 2014, E-Government

  54. Open budget initiatives

    UA0054, 2014, E-Government

  55. e-Petitions

    UA0055, 2014, E-Government

  56. e-Governance training for local government

    UA0056, 2014, Capacity Building

  57. Laws on public participation

    UA0001, 2012, Civic Space

  58. Amendments to the law on community associations

    UA0002, 2012, Civic Space

  59. Amendments to resolutions on collaboration with civil society

    UA0003, 2012, E-Government

  60. Training for public servants on consultations

    UA0004, 2012, Capacity Building

  61. Harmonisation of access to information laws

    UA0005, 2012, E-Government

  62. By-laws on access to information

    UA0006, 2012, Legislation & Regulation

  63. Guidelines for classifying data

    UA0007, 2012, Public Participation

  64. Public information recording systems

    UA0008, 2012, Records Management

  65. Law on public broadcasting

    UA0009, 2012, Civic Space

  66. Public access to information in state registers

    UA0010, 2012, E-Government

  67. Starred commitment Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

    UA0011, 2012, E-Government

  68. Law for controlling declarations of public servants

    UA0012, 2012, Asset Disclosure

  69. Public declarations of officials’ assets

    UA0013, 2012, Asset Disclosure

  70. Guidelines on conflicts of interest

    UA0014, 2012, Conflicts of Interest

  71. Updated anti-corruption laws

    UA0015, 2012, E-Government

  72. Regional anti-corruption programmes

    UA0016, 2012, E-Government

  73. Law on competitive e-government procurement

    UA0017, 2012, E-Government

  74. Starred commitment Administrative services reforms

    UA0018, 2012, E-Government

  75. Electronic access to administrative services

    UA0019, 2012, E-Government

  76. Governmental web portal of administrative services

    UA0020, 2012, E-Government

  77. Administrative services in a digital format

    UA0021, 2012,

  78. Starred commitment Regional administrative service centres

    UA0022, 2012, Public Service Delivery

  79. Programme for promotion of e-government

    UA0023, 2012, E-Government

  80. Electronic collaboration between executive agencies

    UA0024, 2012,

  81. Web-based petitions system

    UA0025, 2012,

  82. One stop shop for e-Reporting

    UA0026, 2012, E-Government

  83. E-region pilot project

    UA0027, 2012, E-Government

  84. Network of e-government practitioners

    UA0028, 2012, Public Participation

  85. Public libraries as bridges towards e-governance

    UA0029, 2012, E-Government

  86. E-government knowledge management portal

    UA0030, 2012,