Introduction

The following text was contributed by the Government of Chile. 

In the mid-nineties, following the return to democracy (1990), Chile began a process of cultural change aimed toward greater transparency. At that point, the Chilean state was known as a “state of secret”. Corruption cases reinforced the need for a pro-transparency agenda that became increasingly formalized from 2002-2003 onwards. It was an agenda of "consensus" that would ultimately change the political makeup of the government.
 
Increasing Public Access

One of the most important milestones during this pro-transparency reform period has been the enactment of a 2008 law increasing public access to information. To monitor compliance, the government created an independent agency, the Council for Transparency.
 
One outcome of the law has been the revelation of the properties, assets, and potential conflicts of interest for government officials. This has generated news reports and increased audits and scrutiny by civil society representatives, which have in turn helped restore integrity and stronger accountability mechanisms among public officials. Other measures have gone  up for parliamentary debate, including a new regulation on lobbying and financing of electoral campaigns, which was approved  and came into force for the last municipal election.
 
Additionally, other open government initiatives are in the works, such as the public data portal  which allows for databases that can build applications and provide information of public interest. 
 
Chile’s Action Plan

The government of Chile submitted a letter of intent to join the Open Government Partnership (OGP) in September 2012 and  In December, officials created a domestic OGP working group to elaborate a proposal for the country action plan,  that included four NGOs and the Comptroller General of the Republic and the Commission for Transparency, which are autonomous auditors in this area. The plan was presented on March 30, 2012 by President Sebastián Piñera to the Chilean public, after being subjected to public consultation. 

In the mid-nineties, following the return to democracy (1990), Chile began a process of cultural change aimed toward greater transparency. At that point, the Chilean state was known as a “state of secret”. Corruption cases reinforced the need for a pro-transparency agenda that became increasingly formalized from 2002-2003 onwards. It was an agenda of "consensus" that would ultimately change the political makeup of the government.
 

Chile's Letter of Intent to Join OGP:

PDF File: